Where children learn to read!

Kids Reading Books

The goal of any reading program should ultimately be to have kids reading books independently, with the ability to comprehend for meaning and communicate meaning to others. As a means to this end, teachers and parents need to provide their children and students with a reading program that systematically teaches the fundamental skills needed to become a fluent reader.

Informed by decades of study into the best ways to teach reading, the most effective reading programs are those that target the five literacy skills that contribute to reading fluency:

  • Phonemic awareness
  • Phonics
  • Fluency
  • Vocabulary
  • Text comprehension

In some reading programs it seems as if focus is placed heavily on one or two literacy skills, such as phonics or vocabulary, to the exclusion of other areas. One only has to do a quick trawl through the internet or a bookshop to find an ample supply of phonics activity webpages and workbooks. And the same goes for vocabulary books. These two areas lend themselves quite easily to a seemingly endless array of activities.

However, in order for those activities to be truly effective in developing a deeper understanding of phonics or enlarging a child’s vocabulary, these skills must be developed and honed within a larger framework that incorporates all five of the aforementioned literacy skills.

Kids reading books should be the goal of any reading program, and in order to make this outcome even more likely in the classroom or at home, here are a few easy things to do to help you on your way:

  • Provide your child with a wide range of books, whether at home or in the classroom
  • Visit the library and go to bookstores.
  • Give your child a book as a gift.
  • Always be available to help them with their reading.
  • When you read together, make it as comfortable and enjoyable as possible.
  • Look for opportunities to read books that complement what they are learning at school. Are they studying bugs? Read The Hungry Caterpillar. Are they learning the fine art of letter writing? Read The Jolly Postman. Is there a new baby in the house? Give Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes a try.
  • Don’t forget to wear your own reading on your sleeve—let your kids see you read. Reading your own books is a powerful example to kids.

ABC Reading Eggs uses a wide variety of research-based learning activities, all of which incorporate the five essential literacy elements of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension. Lessons feature vibrant animations, catchy songs and rewards for children to earn upon completion – all of which keep young learners motivated to learn.

The goal of every lesson within Reading Eggs is to ultimately have kids reading books independently. Every lesson from lesson 9 onwards ends with an e-book that directly relates to the content of the lesson. In this way, all literacy skills that kids learn within the Reading Eggs lessons are reinforced and put into practice, which further reminds both kids and parents alike that the purpose of every ABC Reading Eggs lesson is kids reading books.

Testimonials

My 7-year-old son has learning challenges in the area of reading and resists reading. He took to Reading Eggs immediately and has never complained about doing the program. He loves the variety of activities and especially earning the characters. He is making good progress with his skills. Today we sat down to read a new book and I was having him read all the words that didn’t overwhelm him in length. He protested that this was a Level 2 reader and was very pleased when I told him that he is now reading at that level. I am very pleased with this program and it is very affordable. Becky M.

Reading Eggs has simply taken off in our school! It allows students to work at their own level and provides students at the lower end of the scale with the opportunity to gain success. The kids love the games, stories and different challenges! Claire Badrock, Meekatharra School of the Air

Links

The Guardian’s list for best children’s books http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/may/12/best-childrens-books-ever

Michael Morpurgo’s thoughts on books every child should read http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/3670594/100-books-every-child-should-read-An-introduction-by-Michael-Morpurgo.html

Mem Fox’s 10 read-aloud commandments http://www.memfox.com/ten-read-aloud-commandments.html